A Conversation with Pat Boone

Show Notes

An interview with Pat Boone on his friendship with Elvis Presley, a special memory on the Ed Sullivan Show, and his love for his family.
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Audio Transcription

Jill Donovan:
[music] That was my second concert I ever went to.

Judy Reamer:
I can’t believe this.

Jill Donovan:
Do you know who that is?

Judy Reamer:
Do I know who that is? I know that man. I talked to him this Saturday on the phone. I have known him for 49 years. What a surprise that you are playing my Hollywood bracelets teenage idol’s most famous song.

Jill Donovan:
You told me to play it.

Judy Reamer:
But look at my age. I’m 70 years old and I didn’t remember I told you to play it.

Jill Donovan:
Actually mom, that was the second concert that I ever went to was Pat Boone’s concert in Pensacola, Florida in Sanger Theater.

Judy Reamer:
Okay, and I have a picture from that concert. Yeah.

Jill Donovan:
Yes.

Judy Reamer:
Okay. Now I have an idea.

Jill Donovan:
Okay, tell me.

Judy Reamer:
Okay. Pat has –

Jill Donovan:
This is my mom, Judy Reamer, and mom is with us for our second bracelets podcast, and you know how we like to make phone calls on this show and so are you okay if we call Pat Boone?

Judy Reamer:
Yes, but call him right now.

Jill Donovan:
Okay.

Judy Reamer:
Because I’m so excited. Hello. Hi. Is this Forest Gump?

Patrick Boone:
Yes it is. Yes, it’s Forest Gump.

Judy Reamer:
Patrick Boone.

Patrick Boone:
Yeah, he’s here too.

Judy Reamer:
Okay. You know what I was thinking about? I’m doing a bracelets podcast with my daughter Jill, and she played Love Letters in the Sand, and so I said, “I know that man. I know him well,” and all of a sudden what came to me was when I was talking to you Saturday, you reminded me of your radio program. You’re doing Sirius, right?

Patrick Boone:
It’s 50s on five. It’s only one hour a week, but they bicycle it around to eight or 10 times during the week. So you never know, if you listen to 50s on five, I may startle you unexpectedly, and there’ve been many themes like food, all the songs in the 50s about food, or clothing, or girls, or guys or cars, and things like that, and Gene Simmons of Kiss said he was listening to the show and enjoying it, and what hit me was That Kiss became a phenomenon. He’s a very bright guy and a very … what’s the word, very smart at what he does, and so for him to call and say he was enjoying the show was quite a compliment and I realized that all of my stuff, my major hits were before there was a Kiss, and I’ve learned that when I met with people like Bono and Edge of U2, they were fans when they were kids, and that was true of The Beatles. They all were fans when they were just growing up, and Elvis and I were the ones that were having all the success right then and they wanted to emulate that.

Judy Reamer:
That’s not a sentence you hear very often. Elvis and I … great.

Patrick Boone:
Well, Elvis and I were friends. We were two Tennessee boys. He was from Memphis and I was Nashville, and thank God I had an 11 month headstart on Elvis with my recording. My first major hit record, the first record I made on Dot Records was a cover of an R&B classic. Not at the time it was classic, it was just a big hit. Two Hearts, Two Kisses on the 2 Tone label by The Charms, but of course R&B music was called race music and it wasn’t played on pop radio, but Randy with Dot Records had me do my version of that song and it sounded enough like theirs, although they were a group and I’m just one guy, so it was hard for me to sound like a group, but I sounded more like a groupie than a group, but I did have a million selling top 10 record of their song, which of course they were thrilled about because it drew them over into bracelets and pop radio, which they couldn’t get to on their own. The next was in March of that year, ’55 which was Ain’t That a Shame.

Judy Reamer:
Ain’t That a Shame.

Patrick Boone:
He wrote the song and sold about 150,000, which was a major hit in the R&B field, number one, but then I recorded it as a pop rock and roll record and it sold a million and a half, 10 times what he had sold, and he was thrilled because he wrote the song and he said, “I made more money from Pat Boone’s record of my song and than from my own, because he pulled it over into pop music,” and I did that then with a number of other cover records after that, and then eventually I could record stuff besides R&B, and of course I did, but that was the way I got going was here’s a white kid from Nashville doing what was then called race music –

Jill Donovan:
Interesting.

Patrick Boone:
And having hits, rock and roll hits, which were great for me because they were million sellers, but they were all so grateful, the guys who wrote them, the original black artists, and so not everybody in the music business is old enough to remember how that all went down, and some people actually think I was stealing from Little Richard or [inaudible 00:05:59] when I did their songs and impeding their progress. That was not the case. There were many, many hits in the R&B field at that time and many artists that were successful. R&B artists who don’t nobody knows today because nobody covered their songs and did them as pop records or rock and roll. See there was no rock and roll when I started, it was all just pop Broadway, tin pan alley, all of that, and rock and roll was kind of an erotic phrase heard in R&B music. Let’s rock and roll all night long, but we adopted that phrase, Elvis and I, and others, and we were midwives at the birth of rock and roll.

Jill Donovan:
Wow.

Patrick Boone:
I’m not sure that I want to take credit for that, but it’s just a fact.

Jill Donovan:
Mr. Boone, this is Judy’s daughter, Jill.

Patrick Boone:
I was told you were going to be on.

Jill Donovan:
I am so happy to talk to you. It was 1980, maybe ’82, and you are my second concert that I ever went to. You were so kind and gracious and we got a picture together after the concert. You probably don’t remember this, but I went on to college, graduated from college and went to Russia for the summer, a missions trip and I wrote you a letter and thanked you for everything that you had done for my family and meeting my mom and dad and how you changed the trajectory of our lives, and you paid my way to go to Russia on missions that summer, and I know I wrote you a thank you note to thank you.

Patrick Boone:
And I do remember because it was very important to me. It was not me doing that, by the way. I was just in the hand of God. He brought us together. He’s weaving this incredible tapestry of peoples’ lives together, and I feel like I’m living in one of those fabulous 50,000 word novels, [inaudible 00:08:12] generational novels, and you read about two people who knew each other when they were young and then countless things happened and they don’t even think about each other for years, and then they’re brought back together and one is the head of state and the other is a hardened criminal or something. I mean it’s amazing how God weaves peoples’ lives together.

Jill Donovan:
Well, I want to thank you. I know I thanked you before, but I’m excited that I get the opportunity to say thank you for everything that you have done for my family throughout the last 49 years and for taking the time to meet my mom and dad backstage after your concert and pouring into her life and then baptizing her. I’m so grateful for it, because that forever changed the course of our family’s life and even my children’s lives.

Patrick Boone:
Well it’s a milestone in my life too.

Jill Donovan:
Yeah.

Patrick Boone:
I mean it’s one of the things that I look back to and say, “God, you are working in my life and I can’t thank you enough,” because I was there and I had the experience and some Bible knowledge to share and he did the rest. I mean it was a receptive heart and Judy and an aghast surprise and her husband.

Judy Reamer:
Yes. Bernie, yes.

Patrick Boone:
Bernie … I mean his jaw was hanging open for days.

Judy Reamer:
Oh yeah, for days, but we were in your dressing room for four hours and 15 minutes and Bernie said not one word. God had put a bandaid on his mouth so that I wouldn’t be distracted.

Patrick Boone:
Yeah, I mean it was all so new to him and just so unknown.

Judy Reamer:
And me too.

Patrick Boone:
And he goes, “What is this? What has my wife gotten into? Bracelets? What is all of this?”

Judy Reamer:
Right, right.

Patrick Boone:
Well of course he eventually got the message too.

Judy Reamer:
Yes. Yes.

Patrick Boone:
Because the Bible says God watches over his word to perform it, and when his word goes forth, it will accomplish that to which he sends it. So it’s powerful, the Bible says, like a two edged sword.

Jill Donovan:
Pat, can I ask you … or Mr. Boone. I just feel like I should call you Mr. Boone.

Patrick Boone:
Oh, Pat.

Jill Donovan:
Uncles Pat, I wanted to ask you what of all the songs that you have ever sung, and whether or not it was the top selling one, what is your favorite that moves you the most to this day?

Patrick Boone:
It would have to be three. I couldn’t separate the three. One is April Love, which was written for me by two Academy Award writers for my second movie, and that was the name of the movie and so they worked with that title and they wrote a beautiful song, which became a number 1 million seller, but they didn’t know … I mean whoever came up with the title for the movie, and even Paul Francis Webster and Sammy Fein, the writers, didn’t know that my wife’s birthday is April 24th. So she was always my April love, and that song had and still has a deep, deep meaning. There’s one that has even more, a great love bracelets standard called Here’s to My Lady, and I did that in a love song album with great Gordon Jenkins arrangements, a great arranger, and he wrote for Nat Cole and Sinatra and everybody, and I did an album with him and one of the songs is here’s to my lady. Here’s a toast to my lady, and all my lady means to me. It’s the one song, apart from April Love, that I was consciously thinking about Shirley as I sang it because she was my lady and is to this moment, my lady. When I sing it, of course I just blubber.

Judy Reamer:
You sang it at Shirley’s funeral.

Patrick Boone:
Beautiful, beautiful, but the third one is Exodus, the theme song for the movie.

Judy Reamer:
Wow.

Jill Donovan:
Yes. Yes.

Patrick Boone:
For which I wrote the words.

Jill Donovan:
Wow.

Patrick Boone:
And it was a beautiful melody. Composer Ernest Gold wrote it for the movie Exodus with Paul Newman and telling the story of the rebirth of the modern nation of Israel, and there were no words and I had to sing it. I just … but since there weren’t any, I wrote words that I thought … well it was like I was taking dictation really, mentally. Bum bum, bum bum –

Judy Reamer:
Bum bum bum bum bum.

Patrick Boone:
Bum bum bum bum bum, and I was listening to it for the 40th time on a Christmas Eve, and Shirley was begging me to please help her get the presents under the tree so we could go to bed, and I said, One more time, honey. I’m trying to get an idea for the words for this song.” I wasn’t going to write them. I just wanted to give it the idea, if I came up with an idea for the lyric to some professional writer, but when I put the needle down, bum bum, bum bum, the words, “This land is mine,” came to me and I thought, wait, those four words, that’s the whole story of Exodus and then bum bum bum bum bum, “God gave this land to me,” just a personal statement from one Israeli, one Jew. God gave this land to me and I said, “I got to write this down,” and I grabbed bracelets with a white surface and started writing, and in 20-25 minutes tops, I had written the lyric to Exodus like I was taking dictation, one line of the melody at a time and then the words that kept coming to that part of the melody until in 20-25, minutes there was the lyric, and I turned over what I was writing on. It was a back of a Christmas card.

Judy Reamer:
Wow.

Jill Donovan:
Wow.

Patrick Boone:
And right now that Christmas card is on display on the wall of the Righteous Gentile at Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Jerusalem, and it’s on display along with artifacts from Oscar Schindler and Corrie ten Boom and other Christians who helped aid Jews during the Holocaust, and so for me as a Gentile Christian from Nashville to have written words that now are on the wall of the Righteous Gentile at Yad Vashem, and the director Shaya Benyehudah told me we have a campaign underway to try to make sure that every Jewish child in Israel knows those words.

Jill Donovan:
Wow.

Patrick Boone:
They may not be able to sing this song. It’s a difficult, lovely song, but if they just know those words, “This land is mine . God gave this land to me . When the morning sun reveals her hills and plains, I see a land where children can run free,” and so, again, that’s a milestone in life life, and I just treasure those three songs. That’s why I say I can’t separate them.

Jill Donovan:
Sure. Sure. Thank you for sharing that story. That is … did you know that story mom?

Judy Reamer:
Yes. Yes.

Jill Donovan:
I’m sorry to say that I did not know that story but it was priceless hearing it straight from you Pat. Thank you, and were you friends with Corrie ten Boom?

Patrick Boone:
Yes, she was in our home. We got to know her quite well. I’ve visited the watch shop in … oh gosh, where was it? In –

Judy Reamer:
Yeah, I’m trying to pull … I forget it was two and I know too and I can’t remember.

Jill Donovan:
Was it in Poland?

Judy Reamer:
Poland?

Patrick Boone:
You know, I’ve lost a few brain cells, so I’m not remembering all the details, because I’ve just worn my brain to a frazzle, but –

Judy Reamer:
Pat, I want to say something. People don’t know this about you. First of all, you are so relational. Shirley used to tell me that one of the faults that she had about you, you would put people ahead of making sure you were at the dentist appointment or here or there because you were engaged with people. You’re so relational. I remember I was at your home one time and you had a dentist appointment at four o’clock. I think the dentist was a Jewish dentist, and Shirley is trying to get you to stop talking with me and answering questions, or I want to say this, that people don’t know but they just experienced with you, you also are genius. You really are. You graduated Magna Cum Laude at Columbia University.

Patrick Boone:
Yeah, Magna Cum Laude from Columbia, while I had the movies and the records, and having a child a year with Shirley and TV, all of that going at once.

Judy Reamer:
At once.

Patrick Boone:
But I’ll interject that I can’t take credit for it because it was given to me. I didn’t have anything to do with it, but I was determined to have had a very high genius level IQ. Not that I’ve always utilized it like I should –

Judy Reamer:
Amen, brother.

Patrick Boone:
But I have had the surprising ability to learn things quickly, retain things, and to some extent, put them together and think about how things can work, but the fault in that is that I’m too eclectic for my own good, and so I’m interested in any and everything. I’m interested in whatever anybody tells me and what they’re up to, and they ask me for help and I say, “Well let me see, wait a second. I know so, or I might be able to do this or that,” and it’s like the tar baby. I slap it and try to get loose later, but I’m stuck.

Jill Donovan:
It’s a magical quality that you have Pat. That is a magical quality.

Patrick Boone:
Well you know what? It’s misleading sometimes. I’ve got a lot of people still waiting for answers from me for years about how I’m going to try to help them, because I ran out of time to even think about their problem.

Jill Donovan:
God provided somebody else to help them. It was just you getting the ball rolling.

Patrick Boone:
I have to believe that. Yeah, but at least in many cases, like when we’re talking about now, just us, we are related, because I did have and took the time with Judy and then she had the intellect and the desire like you have to follow up. I’m writing a book, which I’ve now realized I’m going to have to go write some more. I’ve got a good publisher, but he’s saying, “You’re writing a book for people who don’t know who you are.”

Jill Donovan:
That’s right.

Patrick Boone:
And that was an assumption I started with, sort of, when I started writing the book called If. Just the one word, If, and the subtitle, The Eternal Choice We All Must Make, and it’s based on the premise that there’s not one promise of God in the Bible that doesn’t come with an if. He does his part. He keeps his word. He’ll bless us beyond our bracelets comprehension if we will do certain things to manifest our interest in him, not just in the blessing, but in the One who can bless us beyond our wildest dreams.

Jill Donovan:
Amen.

Patrick Boone:
But the if is if you will do your part, if you will seek my face, if you will honor me and my word, like any parent wants from his child. If you will act like my child, then I’ll bless you as your father. I mean that’s what I’m writing, but if the person starting to read this goes, “Well who is this guy? Why is he telling me this? I mean it may be true, but who is he to tell me this?” And so the publisher now wants me to tell more of my own story about how I have learned these things through my constant reading of God’s word all these so many years.

Jill Donovan:
Pat, I wanted to tell you that I had the privilege of meeting your beautiful wife Shirley back on your 50th wedding anniversary at Pepperdine when they did a celebration for you, and I flew out there with my mom, and that’s when I got to meet Shirley, and so I know how deeply you miss her and what an incredibly special love story that was, and I know that it’s going to be in the blink of an eye that you will see you her again and we will be with her. I’m curious what will be the first words you will say to Jesus when you meet him, and Shirley as well.

Patrick Boone:
Thank you Lord. Thank you Lord, and I mean those words sound so incomplete, but they cannot be embellished. I mean, I thank him for every breath I’ve ever breathed. I thank him every breath I’m going to breathe. I thank him for Shirley. I thank him for the intelligence he gave me when I was born, and for all the doors he’s opened and the opportunities he’s given a guy who wasn’t sure … when I married Shirley, I was going to be a teacher preacher, I thought, at 19, and not that I didn’t want to be a singer, but I mean I knew that was impossible. A pipe dream, but I love singing and I sang at every opportunity, never asked for money and never hardly ever got any either. Might get a dinner from a Lady Shakespeare Club or Junior Chamber of Commerce Luncheon. I had a woman who would play piano for me and I would come sing songs and eat lunch and feel good about it, but that’s no way to make a living.

Jill Donovan:
Right. Well look what happened.

Patrick Boone:
Yeah, but God opened doors for me –

Jill Donovan:
Yes, he did.

Patrick Boone:
And he knew that in my heart if I ever was a pop singer with any note that I would … and I’ve sung all the notes by now, but I would try to use the platform or the opportunity to bless other people, and so he’s given me so many opportunities, and it was Shirley, my better half … I tell people my better half is in heaven waiting for me. I just want to make sure this lesser half gets there too so we can be together again, and I find myself actually looking forward. You know, it’s not usual for people to look forward to their demise, but I know it’s not death because I know Shirley is not dead. She’s alive and more beautiful and whole and real than I ever knew her, as great as she has been as my wife, but I know it’s going to happen to me. I’m saved. My name is in the Lamb’s Book of Life. I know that I just step out of this like an old Crocus old, just step out of this worn out body and I’m instantly with the Lord and with Shirley and what can I say, but thank you Lord?

Judy Reamer:
Pat, you know what? We’ve covered what a genius you are, covered how relational you are, but there’s one part of you that a lot of people don’t know about and that is how funny you are. You have a tremendous sense of humor and I haven’t –

Patrick Boone:
It’s hard to be serious very long.

Jill Donovan:
Sirius.

Judy Reamer:
And you know … Sirius, are you trying to promote your 50s at five? You’re trying to promote your program there by saying … but Pat –

Jill Donovan:
But seriously.

Judy Reamer:
Seriously Pat –

Patrick Boone:
Let me just toss in one thought. We started talking about emails from Gene Simmons and Ben Stein and people like that. I got one … I read it on my latest Sirius XM 50s show from a reader who said that people had been telling him for most of his life he looked like Pat Boone, and so he told me this little story, which I read on the air, very brief, but he just said, I was in a restaurant in Texas and the waitress came up and whispered to me, “I know who you are. You’re Pat Boone,” and all I said to her was, “Bless you.” Well, it didn’t occur to me, the writer says, that she started telling everybody in the restaurant whispering, “That’s Pat Boone over there,” and so the woman who managed the restaurant heard it and came over and took one look at him and says, “Pat Boone my ass.” All he could say to her was, “Ma’am, you just poured cold water on that poor girl’s good day.”

Jill Donovan:
Does he look like you?

Patrick Boone:
Well, I don’t know. He didn’t send me a picture, but he thinks, or at least many people do. They’d been telling him for a long time. I was on the Ed Sullivan show.

Judy Reamer:
Tell them what the Ed Sullivan show is.

Patrick Boone:
Oh, the Ed Sullivan show was the number one show on TV on Sunday nights, and everybody in the world watched it, at least in the country.

Jill Donovan:
The Ed Sullivan show.

Patrick Boone:
And it was all talent, all types of talent, and Ed was a great … he was a writer as well, a columnist, but he hosted the show and it was just huge, and anytime you went on his show, no matter what you had done in your career, you felt like you were having to justify it in about four minutes, because whatever else you’ve done, now you’re live, and if you don’t live up to your own standard, then maybe you’re on your way out. I mean, it was scary. So he had heard that I had done an album of America’s great patriotic bracelets songs, and for the reason that young people didn’t know them. They weren’t hearing him even then, and this was in the late fifties, and so he said, “Come on the show and sing one of those songs and we’ll talk about your album.” It was called The Star Spangled Banner at that time. I later changed it to American Glory, but instead of choosing for me to sing, he chose the song. Instead of singing America the Beautiful or God Bless America, well known songs, he wanted me to sing one, of course, that’s not that well known.

Patrick Boone:
So he chose This is My Country. “This is my country, land of my birth,” a beautiful big rhythmic, orchestral, exciting song. Well, yes, I had recorded it, but I hadn’t memorized it, but I had cue cards. So I had the best cue card guy in the business, Barney somebody.

Judy Reamer:
Barney Cue Card.

Patrick Boone:
Yeah, Barney Cue Card. That was just a coincidence. That was his name, and so now he gives me a great introduction. “Now let’s welcome …” I’m not going to imitate him. “This wonderful young man, he’s singing a song that we all should know,” and I start out singing the verse and then it goes into, “This is my country, land of my birth. This is my country, grandest on Earth. I pledge thee my allegiance, America, the bold, for this is my country, to have and to hold.” Now there is a verse out of tempo that I hadn’t learned, but it’s on cue cards. However, as I’m just getting through that part I just sang, I noticed that these big slithery cards had fallen all over the floor.

Judy Reamer:
Barney!

Patrick Boone:
And Barney can’t … he’s trying to pick them up, but they’re backwards and upside down, and meanwhile, I’m live on the Ed Sullivan show, and the orchestra is leading me into the part that I don’t know, and I made such a big deal, we all need to know these songs, and so I had to start trying to come up with words and I said, “With hand upon my heart …” and then I paused. “I thank the Lord …” fortunately it wasn’t in tempo and the orchestra was waiting for me to sing the next phrase. “I thank the Lord for these United States. Yes, these are ours, our own United States. Yes, these are ours. They’re all of ours, our own United States. I’m thrilled to think what this can mean to you. This is my country …”

Jill Donovan:
Oh, brilliant.

Patrick Boone:
And then later … Ed saw what had happened and he knew I was making up words, but I got through it. Now they were nonsensical. Whoever wrote the song could have sued me, but he was dead already, and so now I call Shirley after the show. I said, “Well, what’d you think?” She said, “It was good. You did well, but did you forget some words?” I said, “Did I forget words? Wasn’t it obvious?” She said, “No, really, but I know you. Whenever you forget words and you’re having to think of something, you get this very intense look on your face. That’s why.” I said, “Yeah, because I’m composing. I’m composing a whole other story.” So I did get away with it, but it was embarrassing anyway because anybody … and I have a video tape of it. If I ever want some comeuppance.

Jill Donovan:
Yeah, comeuppance, and good old Barney. I’m sure his career skyrocketed after that.

Patrick Boone:
Yeah. Yeah. Nobody knew except the people in the industry, and they knew it was not … it was just one of those things. I think God let it happen to … I don’t know. It was just a great object lesson for me. First of all, I should try to know the song, especially if I’m going to be preaching to kids that they should know them, and I didn’t and so I really got scared out of my mind.

Jill Donovan:
I want to respect your time and I cannot tell you Pat, what a joy this was that you agreed to … or that you answered the phone in the first place.

Patrick Boone:
Oh gee, I just missed a dentist appointment.

Jill Donovan:
Yes.

Patrick Boone:
Dr. Briskin. That was his name. Dr. Briskin, by the way.

Judy Reamer:
That’s right.

Jill Donovan:
I am so grateful that you took the time. You are all of those things that my mom described you as and then a million more. So I cannot wait to see you on the other side, if I don’t see you before then, and I will forever … as you will say thank you Lord, I will say thank you Lord, but I will also say thank you Pat, because I don’t know what other words to use to thank you for –

Patrick Boone:
Well listen, thanks to both of you. Are an important moment in my life, and as I’ve learned to start telling my audiences … I’m not doing many concerts so it’s very late in the game. I’m going to do what may be my last concert on November 6th in Branson in the Dick Clark Theater, and that may be a fitting place to do my last concert, because Dick and I were friends and people used to tell us that we looked like each other. People thought he was Pat Boone and thought I was Dick Clark. There was similarity. We did look a lot alike, and yet we both came up simultaneously, and so for me to conclude my performing bracelets career … but I’ll be telling the audience what I’m telling you now. I said, I look forward to every show now, since I realized that as I do this bracelets concert, I become part of your life. This is something hopefully, for better or worse, you will remember, and hopefully you will tell people kindly, you’ll speak kindly about it. It was a fun and entertaining time, but you also are part of my life now, and so we have been woven together, our lives have woven together, and it lends to any concert this late in the game important. So this phone call is the same thing.

Jill Donovan:
I will forever remember this bracelets phone call and it is part of the rest of my life as well as my mom’s, and so that’s so beautifully said, and I hope that we … it is actually on my calendar, November 6th for Branson. I actually have it. I don’t know if … mom, did you know Pat was … did I know something about Pat that you didn’t know?

Judy Reamer:
Yes you did.

Jill Donovan:
Well how bout that? It’s in my calendar, but I just thank you and I pray many blessings upon you and every single person that you impact. I know there are millions of people that you have, and I’m so glad to be just one of those.

Patrick Boone:
Well God is good to you and to me. We’ll take at least a half an eon to catch up.

Jill Donovan:
Well, thank you Pat, and I hope that we get to see you in November, and please don’t drive too fast to the dentist.

Patrick Boone:
No. I’m already too late.

Jill Donovan:
Reschedule.

Patrick Boone:
I’ll have to let this tooth go.

Jill Donovan:
Exactly.

Patrick Boone:
Okay.

Jill Donovan:
All right. We love you. Thank you.

Judy Reamer:
Love you.

Patrick Boone:
Bye.

Jill Donovan:
Bye Pat. Well that was so special.

Judy Reamer:
Yeah, he is really …

Jill Donovan:
My dad?

Judy Reamer:
He is really your dad.

Jill Donovan:
The most I’ve ever talked to Pat has been five minutes at a concert, and then at Pepperdine. So to get to talk to Pat Boone and my mom at the same time for 60 minutes.

Judy Reamer:
Really?

Jill Donovan:
Yeah, 60 minutes. That was worth starting this entire podcast to begin with. So thank you mom, and thank you to Pat for being a part of this day and we will see you next time on CEO-ish. Thank you, mom.

Judy Reamer:
You’re welcome.

Jill Donovan:
Thank you.