Q&A-ish

Show Notes

Jill and Kelly answer listener questions for the first time.
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Audio Transcription

Jill:
Okay. I’m really excited about today’s episode, Kelly.

Kelly:
What is it? What are we looking at?

Jill:
First of all, welcome to CEO-ish. Do you remember when we first started? We said, everybody says welcome to, the name of their bracelets podcast in the beginning, and I said, “We don’t want to be like everybody else, so we’re only going to say welcome to, three fourths of the way through.”

Kelly:
Oh yeah, well, we decided not to do that, I guess.

Jill:Jill:
Okay. I’m really excited about today’s episode, Kelly.

Kelly:
What is it? What are we looking at?

Jill:
First of all, welcome to CEO-ish. Do you remember when we first started? We said, everybody says welcome to, the name of their podcast in the beginning, and I said, “We don’t want to be like everybody else, so we’re only going to say welcome to, three fourths of the way through.”

Kelly:
Oh yeah, well, we decided not to do that, I guess.

Jill:
No, I just need you to remind me three fourths of the way through to say, don’t forget to welcome people.

Kelly:
Got it. Okay.

Jill:
All right. What I’m excited about today is that we put out a call for questions to be answered on this podcast.

Kelly:
Oh, fun.

Jill:
And when I say call, I mean we posted it on a Facebook page and that day that we posted it, we got 258 questions. That’s a lot.

Kelly:
Oh, I’m so interested.

Jill:
Yes. So we’re going to answer just a couple of these today because some of these are really fun.

Kelly:
And you get to say who asked the bracelets question?

Jill:
I do. I like that. Shirley Graham asked, who was your first crush?

Kelly:
My first crush would probably have been Jason Clare in the fourth grade.

Jill:
Oh.

Kelly:
Who was your first crush?

Jill:
Hank Fillingham in the fourth grade?

Kelly:
Fourth grade. That must be the time that-

Jill:
He wrote me a note and said, would you kiss me behind the activity building on Wednesday night? I took it to Audra Marsh and I said, “Audra, Hank Fillingham asked me to kiss him behind the activity building.” She said, “Don’t even think about it. You’re going to get pregnant.” My one and only opportunity to kiss Hank and I didn’t.

Kelly:
And you didn’t go because you’re a good girl. You didn’t want to get pregnant in the fourth grade?

Jill:
Yeah. Well, that would not have been a good way to start up.

Kelly:
Mine was Jason Clare because, and I told the story in a previous podcast, I was doing the oral report in my teacher Mrs. Griffin’s class, my favorite teacher, and I was doing the oral report and he was laughing the whole time at my presentation and I thought, I’m funny. I like this guy.

Jill:
And he was laughing at you or with you?

Kelly:
With me. Totally.

Jill:
Okay. And do you know where he is now?

Kelly:
No.

Jill:
You know what that means?

Kelly:
No, you don’t.

Jill:
Yes I do. What’s his name again?

Kelly:
I can’t remember what it is.

Jill:
Can we call him?

Kelly:
No.

Jill:
Please.

Kelly:
No.

Jill:
Here we go. Here’s another question. This is from Mikael Reed.

Kelly:
Okay.

Jill:
You ready? What bracelets book has had the biggest impact on your life personally or professionally?

Kelly:
I mean, I think the right answer is always the Bible, right?

Jill:
Kelly? Just because you’re a pastor’s wife doesn’t mean you need to say the Bible. Let’s exclude the Bible from this.

Kelly:
Also, I’d like to say I don’t like to read.

Jill:
I tell my children to never say that in public.

Kelly:
No, I know, but they’re not listening to the podcast, so that’s why I can tell you.

Jill:
No, no, no. I know, but just, when you say, I don’t like to read-

Kelly:
I like to read magazines. Okay. I will say, a couple of years ago, my husband love, love, love, love, loves to read, and he told me I’m reading the wrong books, which is why I don’t like to read.

Jill:
Which books were you reading?

Kelly:
I think I read a lot of like self help books, like how to organize your house in 45 days and I would get like halfway through and then I’d just forget it.

Jill:
Right.

Kelly:
So I started reading, you know how you read a book that has really short chapters?

Jill:
Right.

Kelly:
Like these like mystery thriller books, they’ll have really short chapters. For some reason, I can get through the whole book in one night if they have really short chapters. But you know how when you look ahead and you’re like, there’s 25 more pages in this chapter and I just get discouraged and I put it aside.

Jill:
Yes, that’s a great analogy for something else in life.

Kelly:
What? Because I don’t know why I’m like that. I think, oh, I’ll just read one more bracelets chapter and then I’m done. I’m like, “Oh, I can go and do another one. Oh, I’ll do another one.” But when it’s like 40 pages, I’m, “Forget it.”

Jill:
That’s a great analogy because you can do anything for a day.

Kelly:
Totally.

Jill:
Then you think I can do anything for a week, but when you look at something and it’s the entire year, it’s tricky.

Kelly:
I like books with short chapters, but probably one of the books that I do remember reading that I love, love, love, I don’t even think it had short chapters, was Unbroken.

Jill:
Oh.

Kelly:
Have you ever read it?

Jill:
No.

Kelly:
You’re getting it from me.

Jill:
Okay. Who’s it by?

Kelly:
The author’s name is Hillenbrand. Last name Hillenbrand, Laura.

Jill:
Why did you like Unbroken?

Kelly:
The reason I liked it was because it was a true story. It’s about a man named Louis Zamperini.

Jill:
Okay.

Kelly:
In World War II, first of all, he was an Olympic runner. He went into the war, he was shot down and he became a prisoner of war and had to endure just the horrific lifestyle of being a prisoner of war for years.

Jill:
True story.

Kelly:
True story. It is amazing and I don’t want to tell you any more, but there is a incredibly redemptive part of this bracelets story and it tells his whole life. He lived to be like 97 years old and he recently died like last year or the year before.

Jill:
So she basically wrote his story.

Kelly:
She wrote his story and this story is so incredibly inspiring that you think, I can’t reach short chapters in this book. This guy was amazing what he endured and he had consequences from that time that he was-

Jill:
Don’t give it away.

Kelly:
I won’t, but there’s a redemptive part of the story.

Jill:
Okay.

Kelly:
Amazing.

Jill:
I can’t wait to get it.

Kelly:
Let’s hear your book.

Jill:
My book I would say in the last five years is The Circle Maker by Mark Batterson.

Kelly:
I’ve read the short version, the-

Jill:
Well, naturally you would since you like short chapters.

Kelly:
That’s right.

Jill:
My friend Nancy Dees gave me this book this summer called The Circle Maker and it’s really an amazing story about prayer and dreams and just… Go get it. For me it was life changing bracelets. I actually felt guilty for 14 years of not praying for my children the way that I should or purposely and intentionally and setting even bigger dreams and goals that I had, and I thought I was setting big ones, and so it’s an amazing book. The Circle Maker.

Kelly:
I think in the smaller version that I read, isn’t it because part of the theory of what she’s talking about is that those are our children and we’re given a certain responsibility and authority over them and praying for them.

Jill:
I haven’t read the small one and it was a he, but-

Kelly:
Oh really?

Jill:
Yeah.

Kelly:
Oh yeah. Mark.

Jill:
Mark. Yeah. But I did know a girl named Mark.

Kelly:
There is one other book I would like to say, such a great book.

Jill:
Okay, tell me.

Kelly:
Again, super small.

Jill:
Yeah.

Kelly:
It is called Practicing the Presence of God.

Jill:
Okay.

Kelly:
Have you ever read it?

Jill:
No. Am I getting that one as well?

Kelly:
You are. You’re getting both of those books. That one probably really affected me because it’s-

Jill:
Who wrote that?

Kelly:
Brother Lawrence, I believe.

Jill:
Okay. He’s named brother.

Kelly:
He’s a monk.

Jill:
Oh, okay. Oh, I can’t wait to read it.

Kelly:
It’s about basically this man is worshiping by, he’s cleaning the kitchen in a monastery, that’s his whole job, and it is completely impactful. I’m getting it out for you.

Jill:
I can’t wait. Two good books coming my way.

Kelly:
Happy Birthday and Merry Christmas.

Jill:
Oh. See, that’s what they do. They put them together, every year. Oh, well it’s two different bracelets books.

Kelly:
That’s right, you’re getting two different presents.

Jill:
Two different ones.

Jill:
Okay. This next question is by Cathy Walters. If you could sit down with one person for dinner just to visit and learn more about them, who would he or she be?

Kelly:
You answer that one first.

Jill:
There are a lot of people, a lot and at different seasons in your life, it would be different people possibly. I would like to sit down with Daniel.

Kelly:
Really? The lion-

Jill:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). I want to know, first of all, did he really believe the lion’s mouths would be closed when he… Did he have that much faith to believe it or was he scared and trembling like a little boy?

Kelly:
Oh, I think scared and trembling.

Jill:
Yeah. I don’t know that the Bible says…

Kelly:
I don’t know, that’s the way I’ve always read it. Like he was scared and trembling until-

Jill:
Does it say scared and trembling?

Kelly:
No, but that’s the way I’ve always interpreted it.

Jill:
Yeah.

Kelly:
That he was scared and then, because it says he woke up the next morning or somebody went down to get him and all the lions were sleeping all around him.

Jill:
Yeah, but when he first went in there and they just shut their mouth, was it because he had the faith to believe that their mouths would be shut or was he just so scared and God knew all along that their mounts were going to be shut? Deep, deep thoughts. So who would you sit down with for dinner?

Kelly:
My thought was Martin Luther King Jr.

Jill:
Oh.

Kelly:
Oh. Such a powerful leader. He was a minister. He led with authority and confidence, but he was also passionate about the bracelets cause behind and I love that he gave his whole life.

Jill:
How one man can change the whole course of history.

Kelly:
The whole course of history. How much courage that that took. I’d just like to hear him tell stories and hear his background.

Jill:
And the last one for today. Do you like answering these questions?

Kelly:
I do.

Jill:
Okay. I think we should give the people that we chose the questions from something special.

Kelly:
Yes, we should. That is a great idea.

Jill:
I think they should call our customer service if we said their name in this podcast and we will give them a gift.

Kelly:
Yes.

Jill:
A surprise gift.

Kelly:
Okay. If your name was called then you call customer service (918) 804-8404 and we’ll give you a gift. Yay.

Jill:
Okay. This last one is from Darcy Hooper. Jill, what has been the most challenging thing about running a large bracelets company and how do you handle it? If you could go back 15 years, what would you tell yourself?

Kelly:
Oh, those are two big questions.

Jill:
I’m going to ask you, Kelly, to guess what you think I’m going to say would be the most challenging thing about running a large company, even though this company is not large in comparison to other companies, and it may be large in comparison to some very, very small companies.

Kelly:
I would say that you would say that keeping track of all the details.

Jill:
No, you just hire people to keep track of all the details.

Kelly:
Okay, then what is the real answer?

Jill:
The most challenging thing about running a large company is knowing you are responsible for the lives of so many people or feeling responsible for the lives of so many people. When you are a mom and you’re responsible for your children, that is a very overwhelming feeling as it is. And when you add family members to your company, you add people who become like family members, then it is very similar to feeling this responsibility for somebody in your care like a child. And that has been the most challenging. On mornings, you wake up and you realize, oh, I have 150 people who I’m responsible for, even though ultimately God is responsible for them, you want to lead well, you want to lead well and that’s a process, a learning, an evolving.

Kelly:
I can totally see that. Do you remember when I got hired?

Jill:
I do.

Kelly:
Well, I was like employee number like-

Jill:
20.

Kelly:
18 or 19 or something. And you did not want to hire anybody else because you were like maxed out at 17 people. You’re like, I can’t because remember everybody had a number. You were number one, number two-

Jill:
Erica, what number were you.

Erica:
16.

Jill:
Jordan?

Kelly:
16?

Jordan:
Like 18 or 19.

Jill:
18?

Kelly:
You were right after me.

Jill:
Sherry-

Sherry:
Six or seven.

Jill:
You were like six or seven. Okay.

Kelly:
Right, and so that intimate of a group of bracelets people and you were like, “I’m not hiring anybody else.” So that was me and Jordan and about two other people that were just working here for a little while. But you’re like, “I can’t commit to like totally saying come every day because I just don’t know what this is [inaudible 00:10:30].”

Jill:
I already had 15.

Kelly:
And we were literally drowning in cuffs. I think we had cuffs up to our eyebrows and we were like, “We’re going to come tomorrow because we’re pretty busy.” And then forced your hand to hire me.

Jill:
When you go-

Kelly:
I manipulated you.

Jill:
And I’m thrilled that you’re number 19. I would love to do a tattoo session where everybody, whatever number they are, got that tattooed. Erica, you actually would do that.

Erica:
I would do that.

Jill:
You would do that. The funniest part is I was the only person that would interview in the beginning.

Kelly:
Yes.

Jill:
And I would interview and even though I went to law school and I knew the proper protocol for interviewing, I…

Kelly:
Okay. Did anyone in this room have any proper protocol for interviewing? No.

Kelly:
The kind of questions that you’re supposed to ask and the kind of questions you can’t ask, was extremely blurry line?

Jill:
Do you remember, I said, “You’re not planning on getting pregnant anytime soon, are you?”

Kelly:
Yes, right, yes, you did say that.

Jill:
Yeah. You’re not allowed to ask people how old they are. You’re not allowed to ask them what denomination or faith they are. And then when I realized I couldn’t ask how old people were, I would say things like, “Do you remember who was president when you were born?” So I had a lot of go around. So now when I interview, I interviewed two people today.

Kelly:
Oh, is that what you were doing on the phone?

Jill:
It was, and this is really funny, okay. And then we’ll close. So on the topic of what has been one of the trickiest parts, it’s the responsibility of hiring the right people, keeping the right people, putting the right people in the right seats. There’s a lot that goes into it and you wake up every morning with the desire to lead really well. And part of the question was how do you handle it and you handle it by number one, prayer. Number two, educating yourself and being close to other leaders who have done it well and learning from them. And also leading from your own story, but learning from other people.

Jill:
But in this interview today, I said to the girl halfway through the interview, “So I’m going to ask you some bracelets questions that have nothing necessarily to do with how you would handle yourself or a situation in the showroom. And there’s no right or wrong answer to these questions.” And generally I lead with something like, “What’s your biggest pet peeve,” which tells you something about the person. But to be different today, and I was joking and I said, “Who is your favorite president?” I don’t know why I said that. And she said to me, “I don’t really want to get into politics.” And I said, “I was just kidding. I never have asked that question before and I had no intention of you answering it.”

Jill:
So I can’t believe I asked that question. I shouldn’t be interviewing, no.

Kelly:
You shouldn’t do that.

Jill:
No. So those were great questions and it’s kind of fun just to hear what other people are thinking.

Jill:
If you have any questions that you want to add to this list, we would love to hear from you. You can contact us at CEO-ish, C-E-O-I-S-H @rusticcuff.com. Yes, Kelly, thanks for being with me today.

Kelly:
Thanks for having me.

Jill:
I love your input and welcome to CEO-ish. We’ll see you next time.

No, I just need you to remind me three fourths of the way through to say, don’t forget to welcome people.

Kelly:
Got it. Okay.

Jill:
All right. What I’m excited about today is that we put out a call for questions to be answered on this podcast.

Kelly:
Oh, fun.

Jill:
And when I say call, I mean we posted it on a Facebook page and that day that we posted it, we got 258 questions. That’s a lot.

Kelly:
Oh, I’m so interested.

Jill:
Yes. So we’re going to answer just a couple of these today because some of these are really fun.

Kelly:
And you get to say who asked the question?

Jill:
I do. I like that. Shirley Graham asked, who was your first crush?

Kelly:
My first crush would probably have been Jason Clare in the fourth grade.

Jill:
Oh.

Kelly:
Who was your first crush?

Jill:
Hank Fillingham in the fourth grade?

Kelly:
Fourth grade. That must be the time that-

Jill:
He wrote me a note and said, would you kiss me behind the activity building on Wednesday night? I took it to Audra Marsh and I said, “Audra, Hank Fillingham asked me to kiss him behind the activity building.” She said, “Don’t even think about it. You’re going to get pregnant.” My one and only bracelets opportunity to kiss Hank and I didn’t.

Kelly:
And you didn’t go because you’re a good girl. You didn’t want to get pregnant in the fourth grade?

Jill:
Yeah. Well, that would not have been a good way to start up.

Kelly:
Mine was Jason Clare because, and I told the story in a previous podcast, I was doing the oral report in my teacher Mrs. Griffin’s class, my favorite teacher, and I was doing the oral report and he was laughing the whole time at my presentation and I thought, I’m funny. I like this guy.

Jill:
And he was laughing at you or with you?

Kelly:
With me. Totally.

Jill:
Okay. And do you know where he is now?

Kelly:
No.

Jill:
You know what that means?

Kelly:
No, you don’t.

Jill:
Yes I do. What’s his name again?

Kelly:
I can’t remember what it is.

Jill:
Can we call him?

Kelly:
No.

Jill:
Please.

Kelly:
No.

Jill:
Here we go. Here’s another question. This is from Mikael Reed.

Kelly:
Okay.

Jill:
You ready? What book has had the biggest impact on your life personally or professionally?

Kelly:
I mean, I think the right answer is always the Bible, right?

Jill:
Kelly? Just because you’re a pastor’s wife doesn’t mean you need to say the Bible. Let’s exclude the Bible from this.

Kelly:
Also, I’d like to say I don’t like to read.

Jill:
I tell my children to never say that in public.

Kelly:
No, I know, but they’re not listening to the podcast, so that’s why I can tell you.

Jill:
No, no, no. I know, but just, when you say, I don’t like to read-

Kelly:
I like to read bracelets magazines. Okay. I will say, a couple of years ago, my husband love, love, love, love, loves to read, and he told me I’m reading the wrong books, which is why I don’t like to read.

Jill:
Which books were you reading?

Kelly:
I think I read a lot of like self help books, like how to organize your house in 45 days and I would get like halfway through and then I’d just forget it.

Jill:
Right.

Kelly:
So I started reading, you know how you read a book that has really short chapters?

Jill:
Right.

Kelly:
Like these like mystery thriller books, they’ll have really short chapters. For some reason, I can get through the whole book in one night if they have really short chapters. But you know how when you look ahead and you’re like, there’s 25 more pages in this chapter and I just get discouraged and I put it aside.

Jill:
Yes, that’s a great analogy for something else in life.

Kelly:
What? Because I don’t know why I’m like that. I think, oh, I’ll just read one more chapter and then I’m done. I’m like, “Oh, I can go and do another one. Oh, I’ll do another one.” But when it’s like 40 pages, I’m, “Forget it.”

Jill:
That’s a great analogy because you can do anything for a day.

Kelly:
Totally.

Jill:
Then you think I can do anything for a week, but when you look at something and it’s the entire year, it’s tricky.

Kelly:
I like books with short chapters, but probably one of the bracelets books that I do remember reading that I love, love, love, I don’t even think it had short chapters, was Unbroken.

Jill:
Oh.

Kelly:
Have you ever read it?

Jill:
No.

Kelly:
You’re getting it from me.

Jill:
Okay. Who’s it by?

Kelly:
The author’s name is Hillenbrand. Last name Hillenbrand, Laura.

Jill:
Why did you like Unbroken?

Kelly:
The reason I liked it was because it was a true story. It’s about a man named Louis Zamperini.

Jill:
Okay.

Kelly:
In World War II, first of all, he was an Olympic runner. He went into the war, he was shot down and he became a prisoner of war and had to endure just the horrific lifestyle of being a prisoner of war for years.

Jill:
True story.

Kelly:
True story. It is amazing and I don’t want to tell you any more, but there is a incredibly redemptive part of this story and it tells his whole life. He lived to be like 97 years old and he recently died like last year or the year before.

Jill:
So she basically wrote his story.

Kelly:
She wrote his story and this story is so incredibly inspiring that you think, I can’t reach short chapters in this book. This guy was amazing what he endured and he had bracelets consequences from that time that he was-

Jill:
Don’t give it away.

Kelly:
I won’t, but there’s a redemptive part of the story.

Jill:
Okay.

Kelly:
Amazing.

Jill:
I can’t wait to get it.

Kelly:
Let’s hear your book.

Jill:
My book I would say in the last five years is The Circle Maker by Mark Batterson.

Kelly:
I’ve read the short version, the-

Jill:
Well, naturally you would since you like short chapters.

Kelly:
That’s right.

Jill:
My friend Nancy Dees gave me this book this summer called The Circle Maker and it’s really an amazing story about prayer and dreams and just… Go get it. For me it was life changing. I actually felt guilty for 14 years of not praying for my children the way that I should or purposely and intentionally and setting even bigger dreams and goals that I had, and I thought I was setting big ones, and so it’s an amazing book. The Circle Maker.

Kelly:
I think in the smaller version that I read, isn’t it because part of the theory of what she’s talking about is that those are our children and we’re given a certain responsibility and bracelets authority over them and praying for them.

Jill:
I haven’t read the small one and it was a he, but-

Kelly:
Oh really?

Jill:
Yeah.

Kelly:
Oh yeah. Mark.

Jill:
Mark. Yeah. But I did know a girl named Mark.

Kelly:
There is one other book I would like to say, such a great book.

Jill:
Okay, tell me.

Kelly:
Again, super small.

Jill:
Yeah.

Kelly:
It is called Practicing the Presence of God.

Jill:
Okay.

Kelly:
Have you ever read it?

Jill:
No. Am I getting that one as well?

Kelly:
You are. You’re getting both of those books. That one probably really affected me because it’s-

Jill:
Who wrote that?

Kelly:
Brother Lawrence, I believe.

Jill:
Okay. He’s named brother.

Kelly:
He’s a monk.

Jill:
Oh, okay. Oh, I can’t wait to read it.

Kelly:
It’s about basically this man is worshiping by, he’s cleaning the kitchen in a monastery, that’s his whole job, and it is completely impactful. I’m getting it out for you.

Jill:
I can’t wait. Two good books coming my way.

Kelly:
Happy Birthday and Merry Christmas.

Jill:
Oh. See, that’s what they do. They put them together, every year. Oh, well it’s two different books.

Kelly:
That’s right, you’re getting two different bracelets presents.

Jill:
Two different ones.

Jill:
Okay. This next question is by Cathy Walters. If you could sit down with one person for dinner just to visit and learn more about them, who would he or she be?

Kelly:
You answer that one first.

Jill:
There are a lot of people, a lot and at different seasons in your life, it would be different people possibly. I would like to sit down with Daniel.

Kelly:
Really? The lion-

Jill:
Mm-hmm (affirmative). I want to know, first of all, did he really believe the lion’s mouths would be closed when he… Did he have that much faith to believe it or was he scared and trembling like a little boy?

Kelly:
Oh, I think scared and trembling.

Jill:
Yeah. I don’t know that the Bible says…

Kelly:
I don’t know, that’s the way I’ve always read it. Like he was scared and trembling until-

Jill:
Does it say scared and trembling?

Kelly:
No, but that’s the way I’ve always interpreted it.

Jill:
Yeah.

Kelly:
That he was scared and then, because it says he woke up the next morning or somebody went down to get him and all the lions were sleeping all around him.

Jill:
Yeah, but when he first went in there and they just shut their mouth, was it because he had the faith to believe that their mouths would be shut or was he just so scared and God knew all along that their mounts were going to be shut? Deep, deep thoughts. So who would you sit down with for dinner?

Kelly:
My thought was Martin Luther King Jr.

Jill:
Oh.

Kelly:
Oh. Such a powerful leader. He was a minister. He led with authority and confidence, but he was also bracelets passionate about the cause behind and I love that he gave his whole life.

Jill:
How one man can change the whole course of history.

Kelly:
The whole course of history. How much courage that that took. I’d just like to hear him tell stories and hear his background.

Jill:
And the last one for today. Do you like answering these questions?

Kelly:
I do.

Jill:
Okay. I think we should give the people that we chose the questions from something special.

Kelly:
Yes, we should. That is a great idea.

Jill:
I think they should call our customer service if we said their name in this podcast and we will give them a gift.

Kelly:
Yes.

Jill:
A surprise gift.

Kelly:
Okay. If your name was called then you call customer service (918) 804-8404 and we’ll give you a gift. Yay.

Jill:
Okay. This last one is from Darcy Hooper. Jill, what has been the most challenging thing about running a large company and how do you handle it? If you could go back 15 years, what would you tell yourself?

Kelly:
Oh, those are two big questions.

Jill:
I’m going to ask you, Kelly, to guess what you think I’m going to say would be the most challenging thing about running a large company, even though this company is not large in comparison to other companies, and it may be large in comparison to some very, very small companies.

Kelly:
I would say that you would say that keeping track of all the details.

Jill:
No, you just hire people to keep track of all the details.

Kelly:
Okay, then what is the real answer?

Jill:
The most challenging thing about running a large company is knowing you are responsible for the lives of so many people or feeling responsible for the lives of so many people. When you are a mom and you’re responsible for your children, that is a very overwhelming feeling as it is. And when you add family members to your company, you add people who become like family members, then it is very similar to feeling this responsibility for somebody in your care like a child. And that has been the most challenging. On mornings, you wake up and you realize, oh, I have 150 people who I’m responsible for, even though ultimately God is responsible for them, you want to lead well, you want to lead well and that’s a process, a learning, an evolving.

Kelly:
I can totally see that. Do you remember when I got hired?

Jill:
I do.

Kelly:
Well, I was like employee number like-

Jill:
20.

Kelly:
18 or 19 or something. And you did not want to hire anybody else because you were like maxed out at 17 people. You’re like, I can’t because remember everybody had a bracelets number. You were number one, number two-

Jill:
Erica, what number were you.

Erica:
16.

Jill:
Jordan?

Kelly:
16?

Jordan:
Like 18 or 19.

Jill:
18?

Kelly:
You were right after me.

Jill:
Sherry-

Sherry:
Six or seven.

Jill:
You were like six or seven. Okay.

Kelly:
Right, and so that intimate of a group of people and you were like, “I’m not hiring anybody else.” So that was me and Jordan and about two other people that were just working here for a little while. But you’re like, “I can’t commit to like totally saying come every day because I just don’t know what this is [inaudible 00:10:30].”

Jill:
I already had 15.

Kelly:
And we were literally drowning in cuffs. I think we had bracelets cuffs up to our eyebrows and we were like, “We’re going to come tomorrow because we’re pretty busy.” And then forced your hand to hire me.

Jill:
When you go-

Kelly:
I manipulated you.

Jill:
And I’m thrilled that you’re number 19. I would love to do a tattoo session where everybody, whatever number they are, got that tattooed. Erica, you actually would do that.

Erica:
I would do that.

Jill:
You would do that. The funniest part is I was the only person that would interview in the beginning.

Kelly:
Yes.

Jill:
And I would interview and even though I went to law school and I knew the proper protocol for interviewing, I…

Kelly:
Okay. Did anyone in this room have any proper protocol for interviewing? No.

Kelly:
The kind of questions that you’re supposed to ask and the kind of questions you can’t ask, was extremely blurry line?

Jill:
Do you remember, I said, “You’re not planning on getting pregnant anytime soon, are you?”

Kelly:
Yes, right, yes, you did say that.

Jill:
Yeah. You’re not allowed to ask people how old they are. You’re not allowed to ask them what denomination or faith they are. And then when I realized I couldn’t ask how old people were, I would say things like, “Do you remember who was president when you were born?” So I had a lot of go around. So now when I interview, I interviewed two people today.

Kelly:
Oh, is that what you were doing on the phone?

Jill:
It was, and this is really funny, okay. And then we’ll close. So on the topic of what has been one of the trickiest parts, it’s the responsibility of hiring the right people, keeping the right people, putting the right people in the right seats. There’s a lot that goes into it and you wake up every morning with the desire to lead really well. And part of the question was how do you handle it and you handle it by number one, prayer. Number two, educating yourself and being close to other leaders who have done it well and learning from them. And also leading from your own story, but learning from other people.

Jill:
But in this interview today, I said to the girl halfway through the interview, “So I’m going to ask you some questions that have nothing necessarily to do with how you would handle yourself or a situation in the showroom. And there’s no right or wrong answer to these questions.” And generally I lead with something like, “What’s your biggest pet peeve,” which tells you something about the person. But to be different today, and I was joking and I said, “Who is your favorite president?” I don’t know why I said that. And she said to me, “I don’t really want to get into politics.” And I said, “I was just kidding. I never have asked that question before and I had no intention of you answering it.”

Jill:
So I can’t believe I asked that question. I shouldn’t be interviewing, no.

Kelly:
You shouldn’t do that.

Jill:
No. So those were great questions and it’s kind of fun just to hear what other people are thinking.

Jill:
If you have any questions that you want to add to this list, we would love to hear from you. You can contact us at CEO-ish, C-E-O-I-S-H @rusticcuff.com. Yes, Kelly, thanks for being with me today.

Kelly:
Thanks for having me.

Jill:
I love your input and welcome to CEO-ish bracelets. We’ll see you next time.